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21 January 2021

SOCIAL INEQUALITIES IN CANCER: WHAT ARE THEY AND WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT THEM?

Professor Diana Sarfati

Chief Executive

Te Aho o Te Kahu – Cancer Control Agency, Wellington, New Zealand

Photograph by Virginia McMillan courtesy of New Zealand Doctor

This presentation gives a rapid overview of what social inequalities are. It examines what the main drivers for social inequalities are and how inequalities between countries are reflected within countries. Finally, it presents a framework for action to address social inequalities.

THE EFFECTS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT ON ACCESS TO CARE AND CANCER OUTCOMES IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr Ahmedin Jemal

Senior Vice President, Data Science Department

American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA

In 2010, President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) to improve the accessibility, affordability, and quality of care to all Americans in the USA. The law has many provisions, including expansion of dependent coverage that allowed young adults to be covered in their parents’ insurance until the age of 26 years, and elimination of cost sharing for preventive services, which were implemented in 2010. Medicaid was extended to a broader group of low-income adults on 1 January 2014. This lecture briefly discusses the early effects of these three provisions of the ACA on uninsurance rates, receipt of screening, stage at diagnosis, and receipt of treatments.

SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITY AND CANCER INCIDENCE: QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF MAJOR RISK FACTORS

Dr Isabelle Soerjomataram

Deputy Head, Section of Cancer Surveillance

International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France

About Dr Isabelle Soerjomataram

There are clear socioeconomic factors related to both cancer incidence and prevalence of cancer risk. Disadvantaged populations more often experience higher cancer incidence (and mortality) and typically have higher prevalence of cancer risk factors than less disadvantaged populations. This lecture covers a few examples of estimates of the proportion of cancer cases attributable to major risk factors across socioeconomic groups, and also discusses what proportion of the inequalities in cancer incidence can be explained by varying risk factors across the groups.

CHAIR

Dr Salvatore Vaccarella

Scientist, Section of Cancer Surveillance

International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France

About Dr Salvatore Vaccarella

CONTENT


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